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How Does Harris County’s 22 Watersheds Affect You? Bookmark

How Does Harris County’s 22 Watersheds Affect You?

When rain inundates one part of the county but floods another, many residents are understandably confused. Many believe water flows south into Galveston Bay from the highest point to the lowest. While rainwater does eventually end up in Galveston Bay, the process is more complex.

When rain inundates one part of the county but floods another, many residents are understandably confused. Many believe water flows south into Galveston Bay from the highest point to the lowest. While rainwater does eventually end up in Galveston Bay, the process is more complex.

 In Harris County, water flow is determined by 22 major watersheds that drain into 22 waterways from Cypress Creek to the San Jacinto River. Precinct 4 contains many watersheds including Cypress Creek, Little Cypress Creek, Willow Creek, Greens Bayou, and White Oak watersheds to name a few. Most of these watersheds direct water from west to east. That’s why water falling in Cypress eventually ends up in Humble. Wherever rain falls in a watershed determines its path to the bay. For example, rain falling in the Cypress Creek watershed will end up in Cypress Creek.

Harris County’s artificial and natural features determine watershed boundaries as well as how fast water drains through a watershed. Heavy rain in a short amount of time can quickly overwhelm Harris County’s flat terrain, causing flooding. For example, the 52-mile Cypress Creek watershed slopes only about five feet per mile or one inch per 100 feet. So, what watershed do you live in? Find out to stay prepared. For more information, visit Harris County Flood Control District's website.



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